monterey

Monterey Symphony – Strauss and Mahler

Monterey Symphony – Strauss and Mahler

Richard Strauss Don Juan, Op. 20

Gustav Mahler – Symphony No. 1

The season concludes with Richard Strauss and Gustav Mahler. Both of these works require intense playing from the orchestra and give our fabulous Monterey Symphony the chance to boldly shine! Strauss’ Don Juan is a powerful tone poem for large orchestra featuring many passages used for Symphony auditions. The piece is based on the unfinished poem Don Juans Ende which tells the story of a man searching for love, which he never finds.

Symphony No. 1 by Gustav Mahler, or “The Titan,” was composed in 1887–1888 in Leipzig and premiered in 1889. There are as many as six versions of the work, as Mahler was impassioned about perfecting it. He borrowed from some of his own works, and highlighted certain lied, or songs, in the movements. At one point there was an additional movement, which Mahler rejected after the first few performances. This Symphony is massive, lush, and gorgeous—a fitting end to a season deserving of many ovations!

Monterey Symphony – Strauss and Mahler

Monterey Symphony – Strauss and Mahler

Richard Strauss Don Juan, Op. 20

Gustav Mahler – Symphony No. 1

The season concludes with Richard Strauss and Gustav Mahler. Both of these works require intense playing from the orchestra and give our fabulous Monterey Symphony the chance to boldly shine! Strauss’ Don Juan is a powerful tone poem for large orchestra featuring many passages used for Symphony auditions. The piece is based on the unfinished poem Don Juans Ende which tells the story of a man searching for love, which he never finds.

Symphony No. 1 by Gustav Mahler, or “The Titan,” was composed in 1887–1888 in Leipzig and premiered in 1889. There are as many as six versions of the work, as Mahler was impassioned about perfecting it. He borrowed from some of his own works, and highlighted certain lied, or songs, in the movements. At one point there was an additional movement, which Mahler rejected after the first few performances. This Symphony is massive, lush, and gorgeous—a fitting end to a season deserving of many ovations!

Monterey Symphony – Brahms and Sibelius

Monterey Symphony – Brahms and Sibelius

Johannes Brahms – Violin Concerto, Op. 77
Judith Ingolfsson, violin

Jean Sibelius – Symphony No. 2, Op. 43

A Monterey Symphony favorite, violinist Judith Ingolfsson returns in April to perform Brahms’ violin concerto. Judith is currently Professor at the State University of Music and Performing Arts Stuttgart and co-artistic director and founder of the Festival “Aigues-Vives en Musiques” in France.

Brahms’ violin concerto was written for Joseph Joachim and is the only violin concerto he wrote. Marked by soaring melodies for the violin, it contains some of the most challenging passages for the instrument.

Jean Sibelius’ 2nd Symphony was started in Italy and completed in Helsinki. Sibelius himself declared the work “a confession of my soul.” The piece was premiered with the composer conducting and received three back-to-back sold out performances! A beloved work, after his wildly popular tone poem Finlandia, the 2nd Symphony is Sibelius at his finest with whimsical touches throughout!

Monterey Symphony – Brahms and Sibelius

Monterey Symphony – Brahms and Sibelius

Johannes Brahms – Violin Concerto, Op. 77
Judith Ingolfsson, violin

Jean Sibelius – Symphony No. 2, Op. 43

A Monterey Symphony favorite, violinist Judith Ingolfsson returns in April to perform Brahms’ violin concerto. Judith is currently Professor at the State University of Music and Performing Arts Stuttgart and co-artistic director and founder of the Festival “Aigues-Vives en Musiques” in France.

Brahms’ violin concerto was written for Joseph Joachim and is the only violin concerto he wrote. Marked by soaring melodies for the violin, it contains some of the most challenging passages for the instrument.

Jean Sibelius’ 2nd Symphony was started in Italy and completed in Helsinki. Sibelius himself declared the work “a confession of my soul.” The piece was premiered with the composer conducting and received three back-to-back sold out performances! A beloved work, after his wildly popular tone poem Finlandia, the 2nd Symphony is Sibelius at his finest with whimsical touches throughout!

Monterey Symphony – Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich

Monterey Symphony – Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich

Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 3, Op. 29

Dmitri Shostakovich – Symphony No. 15, Op. 141

Oleg Caetani, guest conductor

Guest conductor Oleg Caetani hails from Italy and is making his debut with the Monterey Symphony. The son of famed conductor and composer, Igor Markevitch, Caetani completed his formal training at the Moscow Conservatory and graduated from the Saint Petersburg Conservatory. He won the RAI Competition and third prize at the Karajan Competition in Berlin.

Tchaikovsky’s 3rd Symphony, “Polish,” opens the program. This symphony is unique in that it is his only Symphony both in a major key, and containing five movements. The piece, sans first movement, was used by choreographer George Balanchine for Diamonds, the third and final part of his ballet Jewels. Various instruments are showcased in this iconic work, including a lovely flute solo in the third movement.

The second half of the program contains Shostakovich’s 15th Symphony, written in 1971 and premiered in Moscow, which is full of references to other composer’s works. Shostakovich tips his hat to Rossini and Glinka, as well as featuring the “Fate” motif from Richard Wagner’s Ring Cycle.

Monterey Symphony – Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich

Monterey Symphony – Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich

Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 3, Op. 29

Dmitri Shostakovich – Symphony No. 15, Op. 141

Oleg Caetani, guest conductor

Guest conductor Oleg Caetani hails from Italy and is making his debut with the Monterey Symphony. The son of famed conductor and composer, Igor Markevitch, Caetani completed his formal training at the Moscow Conservatory and graduated from the Saint Petersburg Conservatory. He won the RAI Competition and third prize at the Karajan Competition in Berlin.

Tchaikovsky’s 3rd Symphony, “Polish,” opens the program. This symphony is unique in that it is his only Symphony both in a major key, and containing five movements. The piece, sans first movement, was used by choreographer George Balanchine for Diamonds, the third and final part of his ballet Jewels. Various instruments are showcased in this iconic work, including a lovely flute solo in the third movement.

The second half of the program contains Shostakovich’s 15th Symphony, written in 1971 and premiered in Moscow, which is full of references to other composer’s works. Shostakovich tips his hat to Rossini and Glinka, as well as featuring the “Fate” motif from Richard Wagner’s Ring Cycle.

Monterey Symphony – Enigma and Scheherazade

Monterey Symphony – Enigma and Scheherazade

Edward Elgar – “Enigma Variations,” Op. 36

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov – Scheherazade, Op. 35

February’s program features two massive symphonic works, both weaving elegant stories for the listener. Edward Elgar’s “Enigma Variations” are comprised of 14 separate movements sketching a different friend or close acquaintance. Rather than depicting the person as a whole, a single element of their personality or relationship with Elgar is illustrated musically. The movement titles contain cryptograms or keys to the identity of the subject! Elgar started the work casually at the piano as an exercise to capture someone musically, and evolved it into a large and beloved symphonic work.

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade is based on the Arabian Nights. Replete with Russian folk melodies, many excerpts of this piece are used for Olympic figure skating – making it a well-known and recognized work. Rimsky-Korsakov worked tirelessly on this composition, along with his ornate Russian Easter Overture and the completion of Alexander Borodin’s opera Prince Igor. The work features stunning and virtuosic violin solos–not to be missed!

Monterey Symphony – Enigma and Scheharezade

Monterey Symphony – Enigma and Scheharezade

Edward Elgar – “Enigma Variations,” Op. 36

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov – Scheherazade, Op. 35

February’s program features two massive symphonic works, both weaving elegant stories for the listener. Edward Elgar’s “Enigma Variations” are comprised of 14 separate movements sketching a different friend or close acquaintance. Rather than depicting the person as a whole, a single element of their personality or relationship with Elgar is illustrated musically. The movement titles contain cryptograms or keys to the identity of the subject! Elgar started the work casually at the piano as an exercise to capture someone musically, and evolved it into a large and beloved symphonic work.

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade is based on the Arabian Nights. Replete with Russian folk melodies, many excerpts of this piece are used for Olympic figure skating – making it a well-known and recognized work. Rimsky-Korsakov worked tirelessly on this composition, along with his ornate Russian Easter Overture and the completion of Alexander Borodin’s opera Prince Igor. The work features stunning and virtuosic violin solos–not to be missed!

Monterey Symphony – Concert 4

Monterey Symphony – Concert 4

Jung-Ho Pak guest conducts the fourth concert of the season with works by Tan Dun, Shostakovich, and Alan Hovhaness. Revolutionary experimental composer Tan Dun transposes the sounds of water – at play and at work – into the textures of his music, most literally in Water Concerto for water percussion and orchestra.

The symphonic poem And God Created Great Whales by Alan Hovhaness – commissioned in 1970 by the New York Philharmonic – features prerecorded humpback whale vocalizations, and was credited with early efforts to save whales from extinction. To celebrate the Soviet victory over Germany, Dmitri Shostakovich was commissioned to write Symphony No. 9, which, Leonard Bernstein described as a series of musical jokes (including purposeful mistakes)…completing a boisterous, 99.99% organic, and exciting concert program.

Join us one hour prior to every performance for our pre-concert lectures in the Hall of Sunset Center.

Alan Hovhaness – And God Created Great Whales, Op. 229, No. 1

Stella Sung – Oceana

Tan Dun – Water Concerto
Christopher S. Lamb,
percussion

Dmitri Shostakovich – Symphony No. 9, Op. 70

Monterey Symphony – Concert 4

Monterey Symphony – Concert 4

Jung-Ho Pak guest conducts the fourth concert of the season with works by Tan Dun, Shostakovich, and Alan Hovhaness. Revolutionary experimental composer Tan Dun transposes the sounds of water – at play and at work – into the textures of his music, most literally in Water Concerto for water percussion and orchestra.

The symphonic poem And God Created Great Whales by Alan Hovhaness – commissioned in 1970 by the New York Philharmonic – features prerecorded humpback whale vocalizations, and was credited with early efforts to save whales from extinction. To celebrate the Soviet victory over Germany, Dmitri Shostakovich was commissioned to write Symphony No. 9, which, Leonard Bernstein described as a series of musical jokes (including purposeful mistakes)…completing a boisterous, 99.99% organic, and exciting concert program.

Join us one hour prior to every performance for our pre-concert lectures in the Hall of Sunset Center.

Alan Hovhaness – And God Created Great Whales, Op. 229, No. 1

Stella Sung – Oceana

Tan Dun – Water Concerto
Christopher S. Lamb,
percussion

Dmitri Shostakovich – Symphony No. 9, Op. 70