berlioz

Monterey Symphony – Concert 1, Dvorak and Berlioz

The Monterey Symphony will open its 74th season Ovation with Antonín Dvorák’s Romance for violin and orchestra, featuring concertmaster Christina Mok. This delightful, single-movement work was commissioned to serve as an annual musical tradition for the Provisional Theatre Orchestra in Prague. Based on a theme from the second movement of his fifth string quartet, Romance is a lovely interplay between the violinist and the orchestra. Other iterations of the melody were presented in his later works—it was an obvious favorite of Dvorák’s!

Hector Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique takes the mercurial, and often tragic, life of an artist and sets it to music. The title underlines not only the fantastic musical fireworks that take place on stage, but also a fantasy Berlioz was demonstrating. Written as an homage to unrequited love—the result of too many unanswered love letters—Berlioz uses the voices of the instruments to explain his emotions. The work travels through the artist’s life, culminating in his own funeral in the wildly intense final movement.

Max Bragado-Darman, conductor

Antonín Dvorák
Romance, Op. 11
Christina Mok, violin

Hector Berlioz
Symphonie Fantastique, Op. 14

Monterey Symphony – Concert 1, Dvorak and Berlioz

The Monterey Symphony will open its 74th season Ovation with Antonín Dvorák’s Romance for violin and orchestra, featuring concertmaster Christina Mok. This delightful, single-movement work was commissioned to serve as an annual musical tradition for the Provisional Theatre Orchestra in Prague. Based on a theme from the second movement of his fifth string quartet, Romance is a lovely interplay between the violinist and the orchestra. Other iterations of the melody were presented in his later works—it was an obvious favorite of Dvorák’s!

Hector Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique takes the mercurial, and often tragic, life of an artist and sets it to music. The title underlines not only the fantastic musical fireworks that take place on stage, but also a fantasy Berlioz was demonstrating. Written as an homage to unrequited love—the result of too many unanswered love letters—Berlioz uses the voices of the instruments to explain his emotions. The work travels through the artist’s life, culminating in his own funeral in the wildly intense final movement.

Max Bragado-Darman, conductor

Antonín Dvorák
Romance, Op. 11
Christina Mok, violin

Hector Berlioz
Symphonie Fantastique, Op. 14

San Francisco Symphony – MENDELSSOHN VIOLIN CONCERTO

San Francisco Symphony – MENDELSSOHN VIOLIN CONCERTO

Conductor Brett Mitchell leads the SF Symphony in an exhilarating concert of iconic masterworks. Carnival scenes, pastoral interludes, and ghastly dances with witches and sorcerers make Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique among the most vibrant orchestral music ever written. Then, a masterpiece hailed by many as the most lyrical and influential of its kind—Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto—performed by one of today’s most promising young artists, award-winning Canadian violinist Blake Pouliot.

Conductor/Performers

Brett Mitchell – Conductor
Blake Pouliot – Violin

Program

Berlioz

Hungarian March from The Damnation of Faust

Mendelssohn

Violin Concerto

Berlioz

Symphonie fantastique

San Diego Symphony – Saint-Saëns’ Organ Symphony

San Diego Symphony – Saint-Saëns’ Organ Symphony

BERLIOZ –  Overture to Benvenuto Cellini, Op. 23
POULENC –  Concerto in G minor for Organ, Timpani and Strings
SAINT-SAËNS –  Symphony No. 3 in C minor, Op. 78: Organ Symphony

Jahja Ling, conductor
Chelsea Chen, organ

Copley Symphony Hall’s mighty Robert Morton theater organ takes center stage in two of the most famous orchestral works written for the “King of instruments.” Leading the concert will be Conductor Laureate Jahja Ling. Guest organist will be internationally-recognized San Diego native Chelsea Chen in her Jacobs Music Center debut.

The “Maestoso” theme of Camille Saint-Saëns’ Organ Symphony was used in the 1970s pop sing “If I Had Words” by Scott Fitzgerald and Yvonne Keeley, a world-wide million-seller. Perhaps most famously, this same song and theme were heavily featured in the hit 1990s films Babe and Babe: Pig in the City.

This theme has also been the climactic music of Impressions de France, a film that has screened continuously at the Disney Epcot’s France Pavilion since the park opened in 1982 in Florida.

San Diego Symphony – Saint-Saëns’ Organ Symphony

BERLIOZ –  Overture to Benvenuto Cellini, Op. 23
POULENC –  Concerto in G minor for Organ, Timpani and Strings
SAINT-SAËNS –  Symphony No. 3 in C minor, Op. 78: Organ Symphony

Jahja Ling, conductor
Chelsea Chen, organ

Copley Symphony Hall’s mighty Robert Morton theater organ takes center stage in two of the most famous orchestral works written for the “King of instruments.” Leading the concert will be Conductor Laureate Jahja Ling. Guest organist will be internationally-recognized San Diego native Chelsea Chen in her Jacobs Music Center debut.

The “Maestoso” theme of Camille Saint-Saëns’ Organ Symphony was used in the 1970s pop sing “If I Had Words” by Scott Fitzgerald and Yvonne Keeley, a world-wide million-seller. Perhaps most famously, this same song and theme were heavily featured in the hit 1990s films Babe and Babe: Pig in the City.

This theme has also been the climactic music of Impressions de France, a film that has screened continuously at the Disney Epcot’s France Pavilion since the park opened in 1982 in Florida.

San Diego Symphony – Saint-Saëns’ Organ Symphony

BERLIOZ –  Overture to Benvenuto Cellini, Op. 23
POULENC –  Concerto in G minor for Organ, Timpani and Strings
SAINT-SAËNS –  Symphony No. 3 in C minor, Op. 78: Organ Symphony

Jahja Ling, conductor
Chelsea Chen, organ

Copley Symphony Hall’s mighty Robert Morton theater organ takes center stage in two of the most famous orchestral works written for the “King of instruments.” Leading the concert will be Conductor Laureate Jahja Ling. Guest organist will be internationally-recognized San Diego native Chelsea Chen in her Jacobs Music Center debut.

The “Maestoso” theme of Camille Saint-Saëns’ Organ Symphony was used in the 1970s pop sing “If I Had Words” by Scott Fitzgerald and Yvonne Keeley, a world-wide million-seller. Perhaps most famously, this same song and theme were heavily featured in the hit 1990s films Babe and Babe: Pig in the City.

This theme has also been the climactic music of Impressions de France, a film that has screened continuously at the Disney Epcot’s France Pavilion since the park opened in 1982 in Florida.

San Diego Symphony – The Young Romantics

San Diego Symphony – The Young Romantics

MENDELSSOHN – The Hebrides (Fingal’s Cave)
LISZT – Piano Concerto No. 1
BERLIOZ – Symphonie fantastique

Michael Francis, conductor
Rodolfo Leone, piano

The Romantic movement was launched by the three early innovators on this program, who shook the world and shaped the future with these youthful masterworks – Mendelssohn’s Hebrides Overture, Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1, and Berlioz’ Symphonie fantastique – all originating in the bountiful year of 1830. Michael Francis (Mainly Mozart Festival Music Director) conducts, with rising star pianist Rodolfo Leone.

San Diego Symphony – Beyond the Score: Symphonie fantastique

San Diego Symphony – Beyond the Score: Symphonie fantastique

BERLIOZ – Symphonie fantastique

Michael Francis, conductor
Matthew Krause, actor
Bernardo Bermudez, tenor
Zoë Irvine, dancer

Hector Berlioz’s passionate fever dreams changed the world of classical music forever when he unleashed his Symphonie fantastique onto unsuspecting audiences in 1830. This Beyond the Score® presentation dramatizes how this surprising symphonic shocker came to be. Michael Francis conducts this unique performance that reveals the illuminating stories found “inside” the score.

San Diego Symphony – The Young Romantics

San Diego Symphony – The Young Romantics

MENDELSSOHN – The Hebrides (Fingal’s Cave)
LISZT – Piano Concerto No. 1
BERLIOZ – Symphonie fantastique

Michael Francis, conductor
Rodolfo Leone, piano

The Romantic movement was launched by the three early innovators on this program, who shook the world and shaped the future with these youthful masterworks – Mendelssohn’s Hebrides Overture, Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1, and Berlioz’ Symphonie fantastique – all originating in the bountiful year of 1830. Michael Francis (Mainly Mozart Festival Music Director) conducts, with rising star pianist Rodolfo Leone.