mahler

Monterey Symphony – Strauss and Mahler

Monterey Symphony – Strauss and Mahler

Richard Strauss Don Juan, Op. 20

Gustav Mahler – Symphony No. 1

The season concludes with Richard Strauss and Gustav Mahler. Both of these works require intense playing from the orchestra and give our fabulous Monterey Symphony the chance to boldly shine! Strauss’ Don Juan is a powerful tone poem for large orchestra featuring many passages used for Symphony auditions. The piece is based on the unfinished poem Don Juans Ende which tells the story of a man searching for love, which he never finds.

Symphony No. 1 by Gustav Mahler, or “The Titan,” was composed in 1887–1888 in Leipzig and premiered in 1889. There are as many as six versions of the work, as Mahler was impassioned about perfecting it. He borrowed from some of his own works, and highlighted certain lied, or songs, in the movements. At one point there was an additional movement, which Mahler rejected after the first few performances. This Symphony is massive, lush, and gorgeous—a fitting end to a season deserving of many ovations!

Monterey Symphony – Strauss and Mahler

Monterey Symphony – Strauss and Mahler

Richard Strauss Don Juan, Op. 20

Gustav Mahler – Symphony No. 1

The season concludes with Richard Strauss and Gustav Mahler. Both of these works require intense playing from the orchestra and give our fabulous Monterey Symphony the chance to boldly shine! Strauss’ Don Juan is a powerful tone poem for large orchestra featuring many passages used for Symphony auditions. The piece is based on the unfinished poem Don Juans Ende which tells the story of a man searching for love, which he never finds.

Symphony No. 1 by Gustav Mahler, or “The Titan,” was composed in 1887–1888 in Leipzig and premiered in 1889. There are as many as six versions of the work, as Mahler was impassioned about perfecting it. He borrowed from some of his own works, and highlighted certain lied, or songs, in the movements. At one point there was an additional movement, which Mahler rejected after the first few performances. This Symphony is massive, lush, and gorgeous—a fitting end to a season deserving of many ovations!

San Diego Symphony – Beethoven’s Eroica

San Diego Symphony – Beethoven’s Eroica

MOZART: Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 55: Haffner
MAHLERRückert Lieder
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 55: Eroica

Rafael Payare, conductor
Dorothea Röschmann, soprano

You’ll be moved by the exuberance of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Haffner Symphony and the romantic sweep of Gustav Mahler’s Rückert Songs (sung by Grammy® Award-winning German soprano Dorothea Röschmann). Then brace yourself for the pathbreaking work which took the symphony to new limits of expressive scope. Never before had the orchestra been used to make such a bold and daring statement as Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Heroic Symphony,” composed with the ideal of a hero in mind.

San Diego Symphony – Beethoven’s Eroica

San Diego Symphony – Beethoven’s Eroica

MOZART: Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 55: Haffner
MAHLERRückert Lieder
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 55: Eroica

Rafael Payare, conductor
Dorothea Röschmann, soprano

You’ll be moved by the exuberance of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Haffner Symphony and the romantic sweep of Gustav Mahler’s Rückert Songs (sung by Grammy® Award-winning German soprano Dorothea Röschmann). Then brace yourself for the pathbreaking work which took the symphony to new limits of expressive scope. Never before had the orchestra been used to make such a bold and daring statement as Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Heroic Symphony,” composed with the ideal of a hero in mind.

San Diego Symphony – Mahler 5

San Diego Symphony – Mahler 5

Our season begins with Mason Bates’ time-traveling “energy symphony,” whose traditional melodies take us on a journey exploring the influence of technology on humanity. We then experience one of the grandest and most ambitious — yet deeply personal — works ever written for orchestra. Few works can match Gustav Mahler’s Fifth Symphony in its emotional range, dramatic arc and expressiveness, especially in the famed Adagietto, written as a tender love song to his wife.

MASON BATES: Alternative Energy
MAHLER: Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp minor

Rafael Payare, conductor

San Diego Symphony – Mahler 5

San Diego Symphony – Mahler 5

Our season begins with Mason Bates’ time-traveling “energy symphony,” whose traditional melodies take us on a journey exploring the influence of technology on humanity. We then experience one of the grandest and most ambitious — yet deeply personal — works ever written for orchestra. Few works can match Gustav Mahler’s Fifth Symphony in its emotional range, dramatic arc and expressiveness, especially in the famed Adagietto, written as a tender love song to his wife.

MASON BATES: Alternative Energy
MAHLER: Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp minor

Rafael Payare, conductor

San Diego Symphony – De Waart Conducts Mahler 4

San Diego Symphony – De Waart Conducts Mahler 4

DELIUS –  “The Walk to the Paradise Garden” from A Village Romeo and Juliet
BARBER –  Knoxville: Summer of 1915, Op. 24
MAHLER – Symphony No. 4 in G Major

Edo de Waart, conductor
Joélle Harvey, soprano

Gustav Mahler’s shortest symphony offers a glimpse of heaven from a child’s point of view. Pre-eminent conductor Edo de Waart, who thrilled San Diego audiences last season with his interpretation of Mahler’s First Symphony, returns to lead the composer’s song-driven Fourth. Guest soprano Joélle Harvey, in her SDSO debut, also sings on Samuel Barber’s haunting and nostalgic snapshot of early 20th century Tennessee, Knoxville: Summer of 1915.

San Diego Symphony – De Waart Conducts Mahler 4

San Diego Symphony – De Waart Conducts Mahler 4

DELIUS –  “The Walk to the Paradise Garden” from A Village Romeo and Juliet
BARBER –  Knoxville: Summer of 1915, Op. 24
MAHLER – Symphony No. 4 in G Major

Edo de Waart, conductor
Joélle Harvey, soprano

Gustav Mahler’s shortest symphony offers a glimpse of heaven from a child’s point of view. Pre-eminent conductor Edo de Waart, who thrilled San Diego audiences last season with his interpretation of Mahler’s First Symphony, returns to lead the composer’s song-driven Fourth. Guest soprano Joélle Harvey, in her SDSO debut, also sings on Samuel Barber’s haunting and nostalgic snapshot of early 20th century Tennessee, Knoxville: Summer of 1915.

San Diego Symphony – Matt’s Playlist: Echoes of the Future

San Diego Symphony – Matt’s Playlist: Echoes of the Future

REICH – Excerpt from It’s Gonna Rain
ADÈS – These Premises Are Alarmed
HAYDN – “Introduction” from The Creation
BEETHOVEN – Mvt. I from Symphony No. 1 in C Major, Op. 21
AUCOIN – “Prologue” from Crossing Suite
SIBELIUS – Mvt. IV from Symphony No. 4 in A minor, Op. 63
SAARIAHO – Spins and Spells
RAMEAU – “Entrée de Polymnie” from Les Boréades
MAHLER – “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen” from Rückert Lieder
NORMAN – Play: Level 1
STRAVINSKY – “The Shrove-Tide Fair” from Petrushka (1947 version)
AUCOIN – “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” from Crossing Suite

Matthew Aucoin, conductor
Rod Gilfry, baritone
Coleman Itzkoff, cello

Los Angeles Opera’s first ever “Artist-in-Residence” Matthew Aucoin (b. 1990) has some music he wants to share with you – from the past, from the present and predicting the future. This playlist includes music by Beethoven, Schubert, Stravinsky, Lili Boulanger and others. Internationally acclaimed baritone Rod Gilfry make a special appearance to sing selections from Aucoin’s own opera, Crossing, based on the poetry of Walt Whitman.